January 18, 2014

"… there is but ONE LIFE, ONE SUBSTANCE and this LIFE SUBSTANCE is finding pleasure and self recognition in you."

January 9, 2014
"I believe the Earth is good. That people, untortured by circumstance or fate, are also good."

— Alice Walker, <em>Anything We Love Can Be Saved</em>

December 27, 2013
"… inside us there is a word we cannot pronounce and that is who we are."

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, byAnthony Marra

September 10, 2013
"There’s a mind-set that consumers are doing this just to save money. But I think that what’s really compelling about the sharing economy is the variety and expansion of choices that it offers. Instead of being tied to owning one car, I can drive twenty different ones."

Arun Sundararajan, a professor at N.Y.U.’s Stern School of Business and an expert on the sharing economy

via The New Yorker: “Uber Allies”, which notes that “just before the Great Recession, the average American household owned 2.28 cars, and had more television sets than people. But these days a host of new companies are trying to disrupt the paradigm—offering the benefits of consuming without the costs of ownership.”

(via modocoop)

August 21, 2013
"

A human being is a part of the whole, called by us the “Universe,” a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.

Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely, but the striving for such achievement is in itself a part of the liberation, and a foundation for inner security.

"

Albert Einstein

(Thanks to Elephant Journal for such a wonderful quote)

thank you, guru, for all these lifetimes of practice we get in finding unity and stillness in the vast clatter of this universe.

(Source: amarcedro)

August 20, 2013
RIP Elmore Leonard. Your work taught a generation of young writers how to get to the point and keep things real.
via theparisreview:

“I don’t like a lot of description. I like to judge for myself what a character looks like from the way he talks. I picked up on that immediately. I thought, That’s the way to go, just keep the characters talking and the reader will discover what they look like. When you are developing your style you avoid weaknesses. I am not good at describing things so I stay away from it. And if anyone is going to describe anything at all, it’s going to be from the point of view of the character, because then I can use his voice and his attitude will be revealed in the way he describes what he sees. I want to remain completely out of it. I don’t want the reader to be aware of me as the writer.” —Elmore Leonard (1925-2013), from Como Conversazione: Criminal Conversations in our Winter 2002 issue. 

RIP Elmore Leonard. Your work taught a generation of young writers how to get to the point and keep things real.

via theparisreview:

“I don’t like a lot of description. I like to judge for myself what a character looks like from the way he talks. I picked up on that immediately. I thought, That’s the way to go, just keep the characters talking and the reader will discover what they look like. When you are developing your style you avoid weaknesses. I am not good at describing things so I stay away from it. And if anyone is going to describe anything at all, it’s going to be from the point of view of the character, because then I can use his voice and his attitude will be revealed in the way he describes what he sees. I want to remain completely out of it. I don’t want the reader to be aware of me as the writer.” —Elmore Leonard (1925-2013), from Como Conversazione: Criminal Conversations in our Winter 2002 issue. 

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August 19, 2013
"The universe is a communion of subjects, not a collection of objects."

Thomas Berry - The Universe Story

(via amarcedro)

July 17, 2013
"There seemed no limit save time to the things they were alive to."

— Jack London Martin Eden

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July 14, 2013
"He did not know that he was himself possessed of unusual brain vigor; nor did he know that the persons who were given to probing the depths and to thinking ultimate thoughts were not to be found in the drawing rooms of the world’s Morses; nor did he dream that such persons were as lonely eagles sailing solitary in the azure sky far above the earth and its swarming freight of gregarious life."

— Jack London, Martin Eden

April 2, 2013
"I feel like a wet seed wild in the hot blind earth."

William Faulkner

(via Kiki Falconer)

January 21, 2013
(via Martin Luther King Injustice Index 2013: Racism, materialism and militarism | rabble.ca)

(via Martin Luther King Injustice Index 2013: Racism, materialism and militarism | rabble.ca)

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December 28, 2012
"There’s a discrepancy between our inspiration and the situation as it presents itself. It’s the rub between those two things — the squeeze between reality and vision — that causes us to grow up, to wake up, to be one hundred per cent decent, alive and compassionate. The big squeeze is one of the most productive places on the spiritual path and in particular on this journey of awakening the heart."

— Pema Chodron, from “Comfortable with Uncertainty”

December 16, 2012

Fascinating little history of a man who refused to be marginalized…

via stuffandthinks:

secrethistoriesproject:

12. Bayard Rustin

What do a ‘Communist draft-dodging homosexual sex-pervert’ and a ‘Civil Rights hero’ have in common?

Well, for starters, they’re sometimes the same person.

Bayard Rustin was an activist and teacher who played a key role in the Civil Rights movement. His accomplishments included:

  • Rustin moved to New York after spending time at university and in teacher training, and quickly became active in civil rights politics. He registered as a conscientious objector to World War II, and went to California to help protect the interests and properties of Japanese-Americans who were interred for the duration of the war.
  • He worked on the campaign to defend the Scottsboro Boys, and was an early worker on the campaign for desegretation on public transport. In 1942, he was arrested for the first of many times for repeatedly refusing to move from the front seat of a bus when asked to do so.
  • In 1947, he helped organise the first of the Freedom Rides, sponsored by the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), an interfaith and mixed-race pacifist group. He was arrested while on the Ride and served twenty-two days in a chain gang in North Carolina
  • In 1948, he travelled to India to learn from Gandhi’s pacifist independence movement. 
  • In 1956, he went to work as a close advisor to Dr Martin Luther King, passing on the techniques of non-violent resistance that he learned from the Gandhian movement. 
  • And finally, he was the main organiser of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedomthe event at which Dr King made his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech (link is to video). It was in no small part thanks to Rustin’s careful organisation (of everything from bus marshals to bathroom facilities) that the march was able to stay peaceful and non-violent.

So why have you never heard about Bayard Rustin in history class? 

Because Bayard Rustin was gay. 

(or, perhaps more accurately, because Bayard Rustin was openly gay and not particularly interested in keeping quiet about it).

In 1953, he was arrested in Pasadena, California for having consensual sex in a parked car with two male partners. He was intially charged with vagrancy and lewd conduct: the charges were later altered to a lesser count of ‘sex perversion’, to which he pleaded guilty. After his conviction, he was asked to leave the FOR,and he was later shunned by many members of the civil rights movement.

It’s important to remember that this may not have been completely due to the homophobia of the other civil rights leaders — they were acting under the fear of being smeared or blackmailed by right-wing opposition (after all, these events were taking place at the height of McCarthyism). Their fears weren’t ill-founded, either — in 1963, right-wing Senator Strom Thurmond lectured Congress on Rustin’s ‘Communist draft-dodging homosexual sex-pervert’ ways. Some opponents even threatened to circulate rumours that Rustin and Dr King were having an affair. 

Nevertheless, Rustin never seems to have been inclined to deny his sexuality or to keep it a secret. Rachelle Horowitz, a fellow March organiser, commented that she thought ‘he’d never heard there was a closet’.  Immediately after his removal from the FOR Rustin briefly saw a psychiatrist, Dr Robert Ascher, but seems to have quickly given up on the idea of attempting to ‘cure’ himself of being gay. He continued to have male partners, and formed a long-term relationship with Walter Naegle in the late 1970s which lasted until the end of his life. As the litany of his achievements above suggests, he also managed to overcome the stigma of having been arrested for his sexuality. After being dismissed from the FOR, Rustin became secretary of the War Resisters’ League, and later worked as a secretary to Dr King.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Rustin continued to work for civil rights — and among those rights were gay rights. He also worked to found Project South Africa, a programme which sought to connect concerned Americans with groups working for democracy in SA. By the time of his death in 1987, his FBI file stretched to over 10,000 pages.

At a time when post-1960s white American society was settling into cosily mythologising the history of the Civil Rights movement into a non-threatening, happy story of ‘Rosa Parks sat down on the bus because her feet were tired and then racism was over, hooray’, Rustin continued to ask difficult questions, cause trouble and demand more from his society — and for that, I sort of have to love him. 

More:

PDF of Rustin’s essay ‘From Montgomery to Stonewall’ plus a pamphlet authored by him preparing marchers for the 1963 March: http://www.illinoisprobono.org/calendarUploads/Rustin%20Documents.pdf

Walter Naegle, Rustin’s partner, speaks about his life: http://rustin.org/?page_id=11

Detailed bio of Rustin from ‘Waging Nonviolence’: http://wagingnonviolence.org/2012/03/revisiting-rustin-on-his-centennial/

Profile on KNOWhomo with a brief excerpt from ‘The New N****** Are Gays’: http://knowhomo.tumblr.com/post/11565611172

Washington Post article on Rustin: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/bayard-rustin-organizer-of-the-march-on-washington-was-crucial-to-the-movement/2011/08/17/gIQA0oZ7UJ_story.html

Website for Brother Outsider, a film biography of Rustin: http://rustin.org/?page_id=2

Article on Rustin’s speech ‘The New N****** are Gays’: http://killingthebuddha.com/mag/damnation/gays-are-the-new-niggers/

Wikipedia biography: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayard_Rustin

Always reblog.

(via austro-nesian)

December 13, 2012
"I integrated into nearly every part of the lives of the people I was studying, but I never wanted any of us to forget that I was an outsider. In my postmodern media landscape, it’s been a continual problem where I am part of the story, and therefore part of creating it. Sometimes it was as simple as asking about things I’d seen at other camps, and then having the occupiers look at each other and decide to create the thing I’d just asked about. I was, by my presence, my mode of travel, and even my reporting, a mechanism of information-sharing between Occupy camps."

— Quinn Norton, A Eulogy for #Occupy, Wired.com

December 11, 2012
"Most people carry remnants of other individuals. As remarkable as this may be, stunning results from a new study show that cells from other individuals are also found in the brain. In this study, male cells were found in the brains of women and had been living there, in some cases, for several decades."

Scientific American

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